Thursday, May 14, 2009

The Rev. “Black Harry” Hoosier (or Hosier) 1750-1810

Harry Hoosier was born a slave in North Carolina, but toward the end of the American Revolution he obtained his freedom, converted to Methodism, and became a preacher. In 1781, he delivered a sermon in Virginia entitled “The Barren Fig Tree” – the first recorded Methodist sermon by an African American. Despite the fact that Hoosier was illiterate, he became famous as a traveling evangelist and was considered one of the most popular preachers of his era. In fact, after hearing Harry preach in and around Philadelphia, Dr. Benjamin Rush (1745-1813), a signer of the Declaration of Independence and an evangelical Christian, declared that accounting for his illiteracy, Hoosier was “the greatest orator in America.”

Early in his ministry, Harry became a close associate of Bishop Francis Asbury (1745- 1816), the “Founding Father of the American Methodist Church.”

(In 1771, Asbury – an Englishman – heard an appeal from John Wesley for preachers to go to America to “spread the Word.” Asbury responded, and during the next four decades he preached almost 20,000 sermons and rode over a quarter of a million miles across America – on horseback! When Asbury first arrived, there were only 550 Methodists in America, but by the time of his death in 1816, there were 250,000 – and 700 ordained Methodist ministers. In 1924 when a statue of Bishop Asbury was erected in Washington, DC, President Calvin Coolidge declared of Asbury that “He is entitled to rank as one of the builders of our nation.”)

Hoosier and Bishop Asbury traveled and preached together, but Bishop Asbury (who drew huge crowds) remarked that Harry drew even larger crowds than he did! In fact, the Rev. Henry Boehm (1775-1875) reported: “Harry. . . . was so illiterate he could not read a word [but h]e would repeat the hymn as if reading it, and quote his text with great accuracy. His voice was musical, and his tongue as the pen of a ready writer. He was unboundedly popular, and many would rather hear him than the bishops.” Harry also traveled and preached with other popular bishops of that era, including the Rev. Richard Whatcoat (1736- 1806), the Rev. Freeborn Garretson (1752-1827), and the Rev. Thomas Coke (1747-1814). The Rev. Coke said of Asbury that, “I really believe he is one of the best preachers in the world. There is such an amazing power that attends his preaching . . . and he is one of the humblest creatures I ever saw.”

Hoosier ministered widely along the American frontier and is described by historians as “a renowned camp meeting exhorter, the most widely known black preacher of his time, and arguably the greatest circuit rider of his day.” However, he was unpopular in the South for two reasons: first, frontier Methodists such as Hoosier tended to lean Arminian in their theology, contrasted with the denominations of the South that were largely Calvinistic (e.g., Presbyterians, Reformed, Episcopalians, Baptists, etc. – yes, the Baptists of that day were largely Calvinistic!); second, Methodists were outspoken against slavery whereas the majority of the South supported slavery. Therefore, southern groups such as the Virginia Baptists came to use the term “Hoosiers” as an insulting term of derision that they applied to Methodists like Black Harry Hoosier, meaning that they were anti-slavery in belief and Arminian in theology.

Fisk University history professor William Piersen believes that this is the source of the term “Hoosier” that was applied to the inhabitants of Indiana. Piersen explains, “Such an etymology would offer Indiana a plausible and worthy first Hoosier – ‘Black Harry’ Hoosier – the greatest preacher of his day, a man who rejected slavery and stood up for morality and the common man.”

Noted African American historian Carter Woodson reported the words of early Methodist historian John Ledman in describing the closing chapter of Harry Hoosier’s life:

After he had moved on the tide of popularity for a number of years . . . he fell by wine – one of the strong enemies of both ministers and people. And now, alas! this popular preacher was a drunken ragpicker in the streets of Philadelphia. But we will not leave him here. One evening, Harry . . . determined to remain there until his backslidings were healed. Under a tree he wrestled with God in prayer. Sometime that night, God restored to him the joys of his salvation [Psalm 51:12]. . . . About the year 1810, Harry finished his course. . . . An unusually large number of people, both white and colored, followed his body to its last resting place, in a free burying ground in Kensington [near Philadelphia].

The Rev. Harry Hoosier was used by God to draw thousands of Americans to Christ during the early decades of the Second Great Awakening.

(from: WallBuilders.com)





K.P. Yohannan

Growing up in a small village in South India, Dr. K.P. Yohannan began his spiritual journey at the age of eight when he gave his life to Christ. His godly mother fasted and prayed each week for God to call one of her six boys to serve the Lord. Her prayers were answered when K.P., her youngest son, surrendered his ambitions to the Lord and committed to full-time service in North India.

After eight years of serving the Lord in the subcontinent, he went to the U.S. for his theological studies and pastored a church for four years. However, he was unable to forget the untold millions who have not heard about the love of Christ in the 10/40 window.

Finally, in 1979, obeying the Lord he resigned from his pastorate to give his full time to missions. From that small beginning, today Gospel for Asia has become an effective mission movement with several thousand workers in 11 Asia nations.

Dr. K.P. spends a significant part of his time traveling to many nations and speaking on the behalf the suffering and needy in our world. His call to the body of Christ is to become His authentic followers and impact their generation for Christ.

He has authored more than 200 books published in Asia and seven in the West, including Revolution in World Missions (ISBN 0-88419-195-8), The Road to Reality (ISBN 0-88419-250-4) and his newest book, Touching Godliness through Submission (ISBN 978-1-59589-055-9). Dr. K.P.'s weekly radio broadcast, "Road to Reality," is heard over 500 radio stations throughout the USA, Canada, U.K., N.Z. and Australia.

(from Gospel For Asia)



Gospel for Asia sermon by K.P. Yohannan Pt-1

4 comments:

thekingpin68 said...

'Despite the fact that Hoosier was illiterate, he became famous as a traveling evangelist and was considered one of the most popular preachers of his era.'

I could make a joke concerning certain current televangelists but I shall not.

'yes, the Baptists of that day were largely Calvinistic!);'

Cool.

Re: the video

Well Jeff, evangelism in India...there would be an opportunity for some people.

Russ:)

Jeff said...

Thanks, Russ.

Greg said...

Interesting history, Jeff. Still, if I was illiterate, I'd learn to read, just so I could get God's Word myself, instead of processed through someone else. How sad that he backslid, late in life, but encouraging that Jesus scooped him back, before it was too late.

Jeff said...

Greg,

Still, if I was illiterate, I'd learn to read, just so I could get God's Word myself, instead of processed through someone else.

Good point, though I don't know how easy it would have been for him to do so, as a slave.

How sad that he backslid, late in life, but encouraging that Jesus scooped him back, before it was too late.

Yes, and a good lesson for all of us to remember, as we are all prone to sin. We must continually abide in Him, for He is our strength.